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Lycopene article

Lycopene

Lycopene, a carotenoid, is used for preventing atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease and cancer. It is also used to treat prostate cancer and asthma. It is the pigment that gives some fruits and vegetables, such as tomatoes, their red color. It is also found in watermelons, pink grapefruits, apricots and pink guavas.
Lycopene supplements are used orally to treat prostate cancer. High lycopene plasma levels from dietary intake seem to reduce prostate cancer risk by 83% compared with men with low plasma lycopene levels. Dietary lycopene and other carotenoids are used to prevent lung cancer. There is epidemiological evidence that consumption of lycopene from foods (12 mg per day or more for men, and 6.5 mg per day or more for women) decreases the risk of lung cancer in non-smoking men aged 40 to 75, and non-smoking women aged 30 to 55.
Lycopene has the most potent antioxidant activity of any common carotenoid.  It might reduce cancer risk by scavenging free radicals and preventing oxidative damage to DNA. Researchers are interested in lycopene as a prevention of cancer, atherosclerosis and other conditions. Evidence suggests that lycopene may decrease cholesterol synthesis and increase removal of LDL cholesterol from circulation. Lycopene seems to have some direct effects within the prostate, specifically up-regulating tumor suppressor genes.

prostate, specifically up-regulating tumor suppressor genes.
Lycopene may be immune stimulating and have thymic support properties that may make them helpful for certain health conditions such as prostate cancer, asthma, atherosclerosis, immunity and macular degeneration (vision).

Published Clinical Studies

 

References

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